An introduction to the analysis of winged human headed bull

Iconography[ edit ] Human-headed winged bulls from Sargon II 's palace in Dur-Sharrukinmodern Khorsabad Louvre In art, lamassu were depicted as hybridswith bodies of either winged bulls or lions and heads of human males. The first distinct lamassu motif appeared in Assyria during the reign of Tiglath-Pileser II as a symbol of power.

An introduction to the analysis of winged human headed bull

A cruel warrior king, he made Assyria into the most fierce fighting machine of ancient world.

An introduction to the analysis of winged human headed bull

His reign was marked by almost constant war. He was the first Assyrian king to come into conflict with Israel. King Ahab fought against him, and king Jehu paid him tribute in BC.

His royal inscriptions were more detailed and more numerous than any other king. His building works were massive just like his father Assurnasirpal II.

Most of his reign was focused on Babylonia and his own internal conflicts. The little information about his reign mentions his building projects at Calah and Nineveh, as well as a conflict at Der in Babylonia and collecting tribute in Damascus, Syria. The limited knowledge of his reign reveal some conflicts in Damascus and a period of decline in Assyria.

The little information about this ruler reveals Assyria being in a period of decline. There is very little information about his reign. The king of Urartu boasted of a victory over this king of Assyria in an inscription.

He restored Assyria to a major world power.

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He is the "Pul" mentioned in the Bible and the one who began to destroy Samaria, the capital of the Northern Kingdom of Israel. He carried many away into captivity. This captivity is mentioned in his own inscriptions, the Babylonian Chronicle, and the Bible.

He besieged Samaria, the capital of the Northern Kingdom of Israel. He died during the siege after imposing taxation on the holy city Asshurand his son Sargon came to power. He completed the destruction of Samaria and the captivity of Israel.

He was also famous for his magnificent palace with his colossal winged guardians. He was the most famous of the Assyrian kings.

Winged human-headed bull | Louvre Museum | Paris

He mentions the name of Hezekiah on his prism during his war campaigns, he claimed to have "Hezekiah captured in his own royal city Jerusalem like a caged bird. Sennacherib returned back to Nineveh and was killed violently by his own son, as mentioned in the Babylonian Chronicle, The Bible, and various other inscriptions.

He also conquered Babylon. He rebuilt Babylon, invaded and conquered Egypt by crossing over the Sinai Desert with Arab camels carrying water for his army, and was one of Assyria's greatest kings.

Human-Headed Winged Bull (Bible History Online)

He died fighting Egypt. He destroyed the Thebes in Egypt and collected a great library, innumerable clay tablets were found.

It was under his reign that the Assyrian Empire fell. Assyrian annals mention contacts with some ten Hebrew kings: For More Info See: The scribes of the chief cities of the Assyrians wrote the accounts of the king's military campaigns on cuneiform tablets, and clay prisms or cylinders.

The accounts are very reliable, even though the accounts do not speak negatively of the Assyrians and are meant to glorify the king. The annals also give much detail to geography and Chronology.The Lamassu were human headed winged bulls, sometimes with the paws of a lion, which were considered guardian figures to the king.

》》persian empire《《 the Lamassu. The Lamassu were human headed winged bulls, sometimes with the paws of a lion, which were considered guardian figures to the king.

A protective genie to guard the city

Start studying Introduction to Art - Prehistoric - Mesopotamia & Ancient Near East. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. The Great lyre with a bull's head.

BC Sumerian artisans often times worked with precious metals and decorated them to make them look like animals. This is a lyre (a type of harp) sculpted with wood, gold, lapis, luzuli, and shell. The lion and bull give off an air of strength, while the human head portrays solemnity and wisdom.

The wings give the figure speed. The belt was added for power and . Many of these, including the fragments of a complete human-headed winged bull that once guarded an entrance to the throne room (VII), were donated to The Oriental Institute by the Department of Antiquities of Iraq and installed in The Oriental Institute Museum.

Bull's Head Rhyton Harvester Vase Octopus Vase Palaikastro Kouros Hagia Triada sarcophagus (Winged Victory) of Samothrace The Pergamon Altar Apollonius, Boxer at Rest Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker, "Lamassu from the citadel of Sargon II," in Smarthistory, December 15, , accessed November

Lamassu - Wikipedia