A reading report on enemy of the people by henrik ibsen

Stockmann gives him a letter. It is the report on the pollution of the baths that he had sent off to his brother the mayor. It has been returned, with a note that the mayor will come by to speak with the doctor.

A reading report on enemy of the people by henrik ibsen

It is crowded with townspeople. A number of them are discussing the meeting, and they decide to watch how Aslaksen responds to the issues presented.

Billing is there to cover the meeting for the paper. Horster leads in Mrs. Stockmann and the children and sits them close to the door, so they can exit quickly if need be.

A reading report on enemy of the people by henrik ibsen

Hovstad, Aslaksen, and Mayor Stockmann enter and take up different positions around the room. Stockmann enters to tentative applause and hissing. Aslaksen quickly motions that a chairman be appointed, and he is quickly elected to be chair.

The mayor immediately moves that Dr. Stockmann not be allowed to read his report or talk about the baths, whipping up support from the crowd. He and Aslaksen work together to convince the crowd that the doctor is out to harm the town's best interests. Hovstad joins in and talks about the welfare of the Stockmann family.

Just as he is about to speak, a drunk wanders in and demands for his right to be heard, but he is quickly ejected. Not permitted to speak about the pollution in the baths, the doctor begins to speak about the pollution in the towns.

From the SparkNotes Blog

He talks of how he conceived the idea of the baths because he wanted to work for the people. But then, he says, he realized the "colossal stupidity of the authorities. He is talking about the failures of his brother the mayor, when the drunk enters again and is quickly thrown out.

The doctor continues, saying that the authorities are not the worst enemies. The worst enemy, he says, is the majority. The crowd goes wild with anger. Aslaksen urges the doctor to back his remarks. The doctor says that stupid people are in the majority and that power should lie in the hands of the minority.

He says he does not advocate aristocracy, but for the intelligent, freethinking minority. He says the idea of the common, crass majority being in the right is an outdated truth. He asks Hovstad if, being another freethinker, he doesn't agree with him, but Hovstad merely shouts that nowhere in print can it be proven that he is a freethinker.

Diagnostic information:

The doctor continues, comparing the masses to mongrels and the intelligent minority to purebreds. He attacks Hovstad for not agreeing with him, and Hovstad shouts out that he is descended from peasants and believes in the people.

The doctor sums up by saying that morality and freethinking go hand in hand. He insists that his message will be heard and threatens to write to newspapers in other towns.

Hovstad declares that the doctor must be an enemy of the people, and, in his excitement, Dr. Stockmann agrees, urging that the town should be wiped out, that vermin should be destroyed.

Aslaksen proposes that the meeting declare the doctor "an enemy of the people. Morten Kiil approaches the doctor and says that if his tanneries are implicated in bad publicity about pollution, the doctor may suffer.

Aslaksen announces that by a unanimous vote Dr.An Enemy of the People (original Norwegian title: En folkefiende) is an play by Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen. Ibsen wrote it in response to the public outcry against his play Ghosts, which had challenged the hypocrisy of Victorian morality.

A short summary of Henrik Ibsen's An Enemy of the People.

SparkNotes: An Enemy of the People: Summary

This free synopsis covers all the crucial plot points of An Enemy of the People. Upon reading Ibsen’s An Enemy of the People, it is good to note first whether or not you are reading Ibsen’s original, five-act work, or Arthur Miller’s more famous three-act adaptation. This ClassicNote works off of Miller’s version, as it is the most commonly available in .

This great work by Henrik Ibsen has become timely again. Just think of all the corporate lies about safe sources of energy and that the GOP wants to do away with the EPA, and you have a strong analog with the mineral bath business in this story (the water is contaminated and needs an EPA to shut it down)/5.

Henrik Ibsen. When did Henrik Ibsen live. What nationality is Ibsen. Norwegian. Say that dr. Stockmann is not allowed to read his report or talk about the baths. Who declares the doctor to be an enemy of the people. Hovstad and aslaksen.

Upon reading Ibsen’s An Enemy of the People, it is good to note first whether or not you are reading Ibsen’s original, five-act work, or Arthur Miller’s more famous three-act adaptation. This ClassicNote works off of Miller’s version, as it is the most commonly available in . Free kindle book and epub digitized and proofread by Project Gutenberg. A summary of Act II in Henrik Ibsen's An Enemy of the People. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of An Enemy of the People and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans.

How does Dr. Stockman say he will get his message across without the support of his town. A summary of Act II in Henrik Ibsen's An Enemy of the People. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of An Enemy of the People and what it means.

Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans.

An Enemy of the People by Henrik Ibsen - Free Ebook